Soil carbon and nutrient stocks under Scots pine plantations in comparison to European beech forests: a paired-plot study across forests with different management history and precipitation regimes

2021-07-15 | journal article; research paper. A publication with affiliation to the University of Göttingen.

Jump to:Cite & Linked | Documents & Media | Details | Version history

Cite this publication

​Soil carbon and nutrient stocks under Scots pine plantations in comparison to European beech forests: a paired-plot study across forests with different management history and precipitation regimes​
Diers, M.; Weigel, R. ; Culmsee, H. & Leuschner, C. ​ (2021) 
Forest Ecosystems8(1) art. 47​.​ DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40663-021-00330-y 

Documents & Media

40663_2021_Article_330.pdf3.53 MBAdobe PDFdocument.pdf3.53 MBAdobe PDF

License

Published Version

Attribution 4.0 CC BY 4.0

Details

Authors
Diers, Marco; Weigel, Robert ; Culmsee, Heike; Leuschner, Christoph 
Abstract
Background Organic carbon stored in forest soils (SOC) represents an important element of the global C cycle. It is thought that the C storage capacity of the stable pool can be enhanced by increasing forest productivity, but empirical evidence in support of this assumption from forests differing in tree species and productivity, while stocking on similar substrate, is scarce. Methods We determined the stocks of SOC and macro-nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, potassium and magnesium) in nine paired European beech/Scots pine stands on similar Pleistocene sandy substrates across a precipitation gradient (560–820 mm∙yr− 1) in northern Germany and explored the influence of tree species, forest history, climate, and soil pH on SOC and nutrient pools. Results While the organic layer stored on average about 80% more C under pine than beech, the pools of SOC and total N in the total profile (organic layer plus mineral soil measured to 60 cm and extrapolated to 100 cm) were greater under pine by about 40% and 20%, respectively. This contrasts with a higher annual production of foliar litter and a much higher fine root biomass in beech stands, indicating that soil C sequestration is unrelated to the production of leaf litter and fine roots in these stands on Pleistocene sandy soils. The pools of available P and basic cations tended to be higher under beech. Neither precipitation nor temperature influenced the SOC pool, whereas tree species was a key driver. An extended data set (which included additional pine stands established more recently on former agricultural soil) revealed that, besides tree species identity, forest continuity is an important factor determining the SOC and nutrient pools of these stands. Conclusion We conclude that tree species identity can exert a considerable influence on the stocks of SOC and macronutrients, which may be unrelated to productivity but closely linked to species-specific forest management histories, thus masking weaker climate and soil chemistry effects on pool sizes.
Issue Date
15-July-2021
Journal
Forest Ecosystems 
Organization
Abteilung Ökologie & Ökosystemforschung ; Zentrum für Biodiversität und Nachhaltige Landnutzung 
eISSN
2197-5620
Language
English

Reference

Citations


Social Media