Longevity suppresses conflict in animal societies

2013 | journal article. A publication with affiliation to the University of Göttingen.

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​Longevity suppresses conflict in animal societies​
Port, M. & Cant, M. A.​ (2013) 
Biology Letters9(5) art. 20130680​.​ DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2013.0680 

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Authors
Port, Markus; Cant, Michael A.
Abstract
Models of social conflict in animal societies generally assume that within-group conflict reduces the value of a communal resource. For many animals, however, the primary cost of conflict is increased mortality. We develop a simple inclusive fitness model of social conflict that takes this cost into account. We show that longevity substantially reduces the level of within-group conflict, which can lead to the evolution of peaceful animal societies if relatedness among group members is high. By contrast, peaceful outcomes are never possible in models where the primary cost of social conflict is resource depletion. Incorporating mortality costs into models of social conflict can explain why many animal societies are so remarkably peaceful despite great potential for conflict.
Issue Date
2013
Status
published
Publisher
Royal Soc
Journal
Biology Letters 
ISSN
1744-957X; 1744-9561
Sponsor
VolkswagenStiftung

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