Phytogeographical evidence for post-glacial dispersal limitation of European beech forest species

2009 | journal article. A publication with affiliation to the University of Göttingen.

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​Phytogeographical evidence for post-glacial dispersal limitation of European beech forest species​
Willner, W.; Di Pietro, R. & Bergmeier, E.​ (2009) 
Ecography32(6) pp. 1011​-1018​.​ DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0587.2009.05957.x 

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Authors
Willner, Wolfgang; Di Pietro, Romeo; Bergmeier, Erwin
Abstract
The frequency of range sizes shows a U-shaped distribution, with 42 species occurring in < 10 regions. The highest number of beech forest species is found in the southern Alps and adjacent regions, and species numbers decrease with increasing distance from these regions. With only narrow-range species taken into consideration, secondary maxima are found in Spain, the southern Apennines, the Carpathians, and Greece. Distance to the nearest potential refuge area is the strongest predictor of beech forest species richness, while altitudinal range and soil type diversity had little or no predictive value. The clusters of narrow-range species are in good concordance with the glacial refuge areas of beech and other temperate tree species as estimated in recent studies. These findings support the hypothesis that the distribution of many beech forest species is limited by post-glacial dispersal rather than by their environmental requirements.
Issue Date
2009
Status
published
Publisher
Wiley-blackwell Publishing, Inc
Journal
Ecography 
ISSN
0906-7590

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