Biomass production in mixed short rotation coppice with poplar‐hybrids ( Populus spp.) and black locust ( Robinia pseudoacacia L.)

2021 | journal article; research paper. A publication with affiliation to the University of Göttingen.

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​Biomass production in mixed short rotation coppice with poplar‐hybrids ( Populus spp.) and black locust ( Robinia pseudoacacia L.)​
Rebola‐Lichtenberg, J.; Schall, P.   & Ammer, C. ​ (2021) 
Global Change Biology. Bioenergy13(12) pp. 1924​-1938​.​ DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12895 

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Authors
Rebola‐Lichtenberg, Jessica; Schall, Peter ; Ammer, Christian 
Abstract
Abstract Short rotation coppice plays an important role for biomass production. Mixing fast‐growing tree species in short rotation coppices may lead to overyielding if the species have complementarity traits. The goal of this study is to analyze biomass yield of eight different poplar hybrids and black locust in mixed short rotation coppice after a rotation of 5 years. Pure and mixed stands were established at two sites of contrasting fertility as a low‐input system. After collecting a sample of trees for the data set, we fitted allometric equations to estimate the overall biomass of the stands. All poplar genotypes showed lower performance in mixtures with black locust, whereas the latter profited from the mixture. In contrast to our expectations, poplars had no advantages from black locust's nitrogen enrichment of the soil. Instead, the dominance and competitiveness of black locust drove to poorer performance of all eight poplar genotypes across both sites. Mixing fast‐growing tree species in short rotation coppices may lead to overyielding if the species have complementarity traits. The goal of this study is to analyze biomass yield of eight different poplar hybrids and black locust in mixed short rotation coppice after a rotation of 5 years. While black locusts profited from mixed cropping, poplars had no advantaged performance. The dominance and competitiveness of black locust drove to poorer performance of all eight poplar genotypes.
Issue Date
2021
Journal
Global Change Biology. Bioenergy 
Organization
Fakultät für Forstwissenschaften und Waldökologie ; Burckhardt-Institut ; Abteilung Waldbau und Waldökologie der gemäßigten Zonen 
ISSN
1757-1693
eISSN
1757-1707
Language
English
Sponsor
German Federal Ministry of Education and Research
Open-Access-Publikationsfonds 2021

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